Neighbourhoods are coming together to make family walks more fun during isolation


People are coming up with adorable ways to entertain kids on walks around the neighbourhood while we practice social distancing.

In a time of self isolation and social distancing, going for a walk outside (while safely staying six feet away from those you see on the street) is one of the few ways families can get a small reprieve from being shut up indoors. And while the breath of fresh air is nice enough, communities across the globe are coming together (not literally, but online) to make family walks all the more fun.

We’re not sure where the idea originated, but Facebook neighbourhood groups and other social media platforms have found fun ways to interact with each other during the global pandemic. For the most part, these ideas consist of coordinated games of “I Spy” where neighbours will put teddy bears or pieces of art in their windows, so kids can count how many they can spot during their walk. There was even a special shamrock hunt for St. Patty’s day!

Take a look:

Some communities have even created scavenger hunt bingo cards like this one, which include items such as red doors and garden gnomes. How fun!

Many of these scavenger hunts are specific to neighbourhoods. For example, the families in Brooklyn, NY have put so many rainbows in windows across the borough that someone created a digital map marking their locations. Talk about coming together (again, figuratively) to make the best out of a sucky situation.

Other great examples we’ve seen of communities finding ways to socialize from a safe distance are kids who are leaving messages for their friends using sidewalk chalk since they can’t have playdates or see each other on the playground. Other families are displaying their pieces of isolation artwork and crafts on their porches for people to enjoy.

Some people have even turned their little free libraries into mini food banks, which is such a good idea for those who can’t make their way to the grocery store.

Do you have a little lending library? Consider making it a little foodbank during this time where lots of folks may be struggling with lost wages! -credit to Olga Kurat

Posted by Michaela Gabrielle on Friday, March 13, 2020

Note: If you see one of these around your neighbourhood and plan on taking anything from it, make sure to take precaution and sanitize your hands before touching the items as well as re-sanitizing everything you pick out as soon as you get home.

These ideas are all wonderful ways to stay connected as a community while we’re all stuck in isolation. So if your neighbourhood Facebook group hasn’t come up with something like it, maybe consider starting one up and making those daily walks even better for everyone around.





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